Tagged: Brandon Guyer

Four Biggest Barriers Standing in the Way of Rays Division Title

It’s been a rough start to the year for the Tampa Bay Rays. Anemic offense has been the theme of the first two weeks of the season, which shows in the Rays’ 5-9 last-place record.

But of course, it’s still very early, and anything can happen in the next 149 games. Life in the AL East is never easy, however, as the Rays have plenty obstacles to overcome in duration of the season if they want to be crowned division champs in October.

Without further adieu, here are the four biggest barriers for the Rays standing in the way of a division title.

Heavy Competition

The Rays have their work cut out for them this year, as they compete in what is maybe the toughest divisions in all of sports.

The New York Yankees, Boston Red Sox, Toronto Blue Jays and Baltimore Orioles are all potential playoff teams in 2013. Each one of them is a definite threat to a division title, but the Rays have a good enough team to compete with all four of these talented clubs.

There are a few things we’ve learned about Tampa Bay’s competitors after the first two weeks of the season. If one thing’s for sure, the Yankees are no team to overlook. Despite having a huge chunk of their roster out with injury, the Yanks stand at a surprising 8-5, as they’ve been finding ways to win ballgames while on the mend.

Once they get the rest of their team back—which includes Derek Jeter, Alex Rodriguez, Mark Teixeira, Curtis Granderson and Michael Pineda—they should be very dangerous.

The Red Sox didn’t come into the season with high expectations at all, but have started off the season very strongly with a first-place 10-4 record. Boston’s rotation was supposed to be the team’s main weak spot, but has shockingly been outstanding thus far. Their rotation has been by far the best in the division and probably the best in the American League, posting a 2.30 ERA and a 3.45 FIP.

The Orioles have began to prove that their 2012 success was not a fluke. They’ve played solid baseball and appear to have a pretty well-rounded team. The O’s are a team to watch out for if Chris Davis continues to put up big-time numbers at the DH spot.

As for Blue Jays, it’s been a disappointing start for them. As bad as they look right now, they’re a team that can turn things around quickly with that star-studded roster. Jose Reyes’ ankle injury, however, will be a big blow for them until he returns after the All-Star break.

The Offense

The Rays’ offense has been flat-out awful in the first two weeks of the regular season. With a wOBA of .277 and a wRC+ of 77, they are currently the worst hitting team in the American League.

Outside of Evan Longoria, Ben Zobrist and Kelly Johnson, who’ve all had solid starts to the year, nobody in the lineup has given the Rays any kind of significant production offensively.

Lack of power is one of the main issues for Tampa Bay, as they’ve posted just a .113 ISO. Another major concern is the how much runners the Rays are stranding on base. They’ve had a very tough time getting the man in, hitting just .192 with RISP.

Although the offense is very worrying for Rays fans at the moment, there is an optimistic way of looking at it: It will more than likely only get better from here.

Designated hitter Luke Scott has been out with a calf injury since spring training and has yet to play this season. Once he gets back, the lineup will surely be more potent with Scott in and Sam Fuld out.

As the season progresses, the Rays will also get a boost from their minor league system. Wil Myers should be terrific addition later in the year, and Brandon Guyer could also contribute.

Injuries 

In 2012, the injury bug was the largest barrier that stood in the way of a third division title for the Rays. Evan Longoria’s hamstring tear highlighted a plethora of injuries suffered by a very banged-up ball club.

So far this season, the Rays have done a pretty good job avoiding the DL. Luke Scott is the only player who has missed any time at all this year due to injury.

For this team to function properly, the entire team is going to have to stay relatively healthy throughout the season. I don’t see the Rays winning the division as a possibility if they’re hit with injury issues again.

Prospect Development

Tampa Bay has a handful of prospects who could be a key part of the team later this season.

Wil Myers, who is arguably baseball’s top hitting prospect, may be the Rays’ X-factor once he’s called up to the majors. He appears to be about ready for The Show, but it’s possible he won’t make his MLB debut until July due to financial reasons.

Whenever he is called up, his immediate impact will be crucial, especially with the lineup as weak as it is.

Outfielder Brandon Guyer and middle infielders Hak-Ju Lee and Tim Beckham are other position player prospects who could all see big league action this year. All three have the potential to bolster both the Rays’ offensive and defensive depth down the stretch.

the Rays have probably more pitchers on the verge of breaking into the majors this season than they do hitters. Chris Archer—the organization’s top upper-level pitching prospect—looks to be ready to take over a spot in the rotation once the time comes. This time, he’ll likely stay there for good.

The development of these Triple-A prospects will definitely come to play in this year’s pennant race. They Rays might need as many minor league contributions as they can get in order to win the AL East.

Rays Finish Spring With 3-3 Tie, Luke Scott Headed to DL

The Rays capped off spring training in Tropicana Field Saturday afternoon, tying the Tigers 3-3.

Matt Moore, who has struggled throughout the spring, had a much improved start in this game. He pitched four scoreless innings, allowing just one hit, one walk and struck out five.

All of Tampa’s offense came from three solo home runs off the bats of Ryan Roberts, James Loney and Sean Rodriguez.

Five of the Rays’ seven relievers made appearances Saturday, each of them tossing one inning each. Kyle Farnsworth, Joel Peralta and Fernando Rodney all had scoreless outings. Jamey Wright allowed two runs on two hits and Jake McGee gave up a run on two hits.

The Rays finish Grapefruit League play with a 15-17-2 record. Their next game is Opening Day at the Trop versus the Baltimore Orioles, David Price will make the first pitch of the season at 3:10 ET.

Here’s a full boxscore of Saturday’s exhibition.

Rays News and Notes:

  • Luke Scott has been placed on the DL, and is out for a minimum of 2-3 weeks with a strained right calf. The Rays will announce his replacement today, with Brandon Guyer possibly the favorite for the job.
  • Buster Posey and Justin Verlander both inked huge contracts Saturday. Verlander’s record deal just reaffirms that the Rays won’t be able to afford David Price long term, Buster Olney tweets.

Rays Lose 9-2 to Red Sox, Myers Optioned Down to AAA

The Rays were on the losing side of a 9-2 rout Saturday afternoon, dropping their eighth Grapefruit League game of the spring to the Red Sox.

Roberto Hernandez got the start, and obviously a crucial one for him as he battles Jeff Niemann for the fifth spot in the rotation. Hernandez allowed 2 [earned] runs on 6 hits, a walk and 5 strikeouts.

Relievers Jake McGee and Jamey Wright also made appearances in this game, both giving up a run in one inning each.

Not much to talk about offensively from this ballgame. Leslie Anderson, who’s now hitting .425, continued his red-hot spring with a 3-3 day.

Sean Rodriguez went 2-2, hitting a homer to provide Tampa with their two only runs.

Speaking of S-Rod, the Rays’ utility man was involved in what nearly led to a bench-clearing brawl. After being hit by a pitch by Alfredo Aceves and then being barked at, tempers flared. Here’s Rodriguez’s take on the incident.

Here’s a full boxscore of Saturday’s game.

Rays News and Notes:

  • Wil Myers, Brandon Guyer, Tim Beckham, Robinson Chirinos, Hak-Ju Lee, Josh Lueke, Juan Sandoval, Wil Inman and J.D. Martin were all optioned back down to the minor leagues in the Rays’ latest rounds of cuts.
  • Matt Moore was much improved in his start during the Rays’ 3-1 win over the Phillies Friday. Moore didn’t give up a single earned run on 3 hits, 2 walks and 7 strikeouts through 5 innings. Stephen Vogt gave the Rays the victory with a walk-off homer in the 10th inning.
  • World Baseball Classic news: The United States were eliminated from the tournament by Puerto Rico Friday night after a heart-breaking 4-3 loss. Ben Zobrist went 0-2 in the game with an RBI walk, finishing the Classic 3-for-11. The Dominican Republic clinched the top seed Saturday afternoon with a 2-0 win over Puerto Rico, and Fernando Rodney picked up his fifth save of the tournament. Puerto Rico advances to face Japan in the semifinals while D.R. will square off against the Netherlands.
  • After being rejected by both Chipper Jones and Derek Lee, the New York Yankees have signed outfielder Brennan Boesch.
  • Before Friday’s game against Philadelphia, 65 members of the Rays organization shaved their head in an annual event to raise awareness and funds for the Pediatric Cancer Foundation. The Phillies’ Michael Young also participated in the event.
  • Marc Topkin of the Tampa Bay Times reports Sam Fuld (hamstring) won’t be returning for another 4-5 days.

Projections for the Rays’ Opening Day Roster

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With spring training now in full swing and the first games nearing, the Rays’ 2013 roster appears to be coming together.

Tampa Bay has made their share of roster moves and put their final touches on signings this month. Now all that remains are spring training battles that will take place next month before Opening Day.

If one thing’s for sure, skipper Joe Maddon will likely have some tough choices to make when deciding who makes the cut.

Without further delay, here’s my prediction of what the Rays’ Opening Day roster will look like.

Starting Lineup

C: Jose Molina
1B: James Loney
2B: Kelly Johnson
3B: Evan Longoria
SS: Yunel Escobar
LF: Matt Joyce
CF: Desmond Jennings
RF: Ben Zobrist
DH: Luke Scott

Barring any injuries, this will more than likely be the Rays’ starting nine for Opening Day. There aren’t really any battles for starting spots in the lineup.

The 2013 lineup will feature a few changes. James Loney will be replacing Carlos Pena at first, and recently-signed Kelly Johnson will take over second instead of Ben Zobrist who will start in right field. Also, the Rays will finally have an everyday shortstop with Yunel Escobar in lineup.

Another thing worth noting is key loss of B.J. Upton, who will be replaced in centerfield by Desmond Jennings.

Bench

C Jose Lobaton
INF Sean Rodriguez
UTIL Ryan Roberts
OF Sam Fuld

Ryan Roberts, Sean Rodriguez and Jose Lobaton making the roster seem to be sure locks for the Opening Day lineup, but it will be interesting to see who wins the battle for the backup outfielder spot.

Sam Fuld, prospect Brandon Guyer and veteran slugger Shelley Duncan will all vie for the job this spring.

I predict Fuld edges out Guyer and Duncan, and there are a couple reasons. He has the most experience with the Rays out of the three, and Maddon likes the plus speed and defense he brings to the team—two things Guyer and Duncan can’t offer.

Starting Rotation

1. LHP David Price
2. RHP Jeremy Hellickson
3. LHP Matt Moore
4. RHP Alex Cobb
5. RHP Jeff Niemann

Joe Maddon has already made it clear that David Price, Jeremy Hellickson, Matt Moore and Alex Cobb will all be in the rotation to start the season.

The battle for the fifth spot in the rotation will without a doubt be the fiercest spring training competition in Port Charlotte. Jeff Niemann, Roberto Hernandez, Chris Archer and Jake Odorizzi will all fight for the spot.

It’ll be a difficult decision for Maddon, and it’s really going to come down to spring training performance.

Bullpen

Closer: RHP Fernando Rodney
Set-Up Man: RHP Joel Peralta
Middle Relief: LHP Jake McGee
Middle Relief: RHP Kyle Farnsworth
Long/Middle Reliever: RHP Roberto Hernandez
Lefty Specialist: LHP Cesar Ramos
Groundball Specialist: RHP Jamey Wright

Besides for Jamey Wright, we can expect to see all the names above in the ‘pen for Opening Day.

With right-handers Josh Lueke and Brandon Gomes also looking for a spot on the roster, Wright will likely have to pitch pretty well this spring to make the cut.

Another notable name in my bullpen projection is Roberto Hernadez. The 32-year-old veteran, formerly known as Fausto Carmona, would serve as a long/middle reliever if he were to lose the battle for the fifth spot in the rotation.

Most Exciting Rays Prospects to Watch for in Spring Training

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Baseball has returned, and spring training has officially started for the Tampa Bay Rays in Port Charlotte as players report to camp.

The Rays have a handful of exciting prospects and non-roster invitees who have plenty to prove this spring, and it should be interesting to see which surprise players will grab everyone’s attention.

Here are seven names to watch for in the next six weeks.

Tim Beckham

Ever since being drafted first overall by the Rays in 2008, Tim Beckham has been nothing less than a disappointment. The 23-year-old middle infielder was obviously drafted with sky high expectations, but has yet to break out in the minors during his four seasons in the organization.

Beckham will most likely be starting the season with Triple-A Durham, but is out on a mission this spring to prove that this is the year he’ll finally break into the big leagues.

Many thought that year would be 2012, but a 50-game suspension and injuries were huge setbacks in Beckham’s progress. Hopefully, spring training will serve as a clean sheet for Beckham to start over and turn things around in what has been an unfortunate young career.

Mike Montgomery

The Rays acquired 23-year-old southpaw Mike Montgomery from the Royals in December’s blockbuster James Shields trade. Montgomery spent four seasons in Kansas City’s organization considered to be one of the teams top prospects, but has struggled the past two years at the Triple-A level posting a lopsided 8-17 record with a 5.46 ERA.

He probably won’t make an impact on the Rays in the near future, but he’s out to prove he’s not too far away from major league ready.

Although he has very good stuff and the tools to be an MLB starter, a career as a reliever seems more likely at the moment. If he pitches well enough in 2013, we could maybe even see him contribute to Tampa Bay’s bullpen this season.

Alex Colome

Alex Colome is one sleeper prospect with very high upside who should be kept an eye on this season. The 24-year-old right-hander has gradually moved up the ranks over the past years in the Rays’ farm system and pitched his way into Triple-A last season.

Colome has impressive raw stuff that can blow away big league hitters, which should make him a sight to watch in Port Charlotte.

This could be the year he makes his MLB debut as he continues to develop as a pitcher. That being said, spring training will be a great opportunity for him to show off his potential to the Rays.

Jake Odorizzi

Right-hander Jake Odorizzi was one of four prospects acquired in the James Shields trade this offseason, adding yet another talented young starting pitcher to the Rays’ organization.

Odorizzi had somewhat of a breakout year in the minors in 2012, going 15-5 with a 3.03 ERA through 25 starts in both Double-A and Triple-A. He also got his first taste of the big leagues with the Royals, making two brief starts.

He’ll be battling for the fifth spot in the rotation this spring against teammates Jeff Niemann, Roberto Hernandez and possibly even Chris Archer. His odds of making the Opening Day rotation are not good at all, but if he shines bright enough he could maybe just sneak in there.

Even if we don’t see Odorizzi with the Rays early in the season, we can expect to see him contribute to the team sometime later in the year.

Wil Myers

Wil Myers is the prospect to watch in Major League Baseball this spring. The 22-year-old phenom slugger was the prize acquisition in the James Shields trade, and is considered arguably the top hitting prospect in all of baseball.

Even if Myers plays well during spring training, his chances of making the Opening Day roster are very slim. There is one backup outfielder on the 25-man roster, and although Myers may be good enough for the spot, the Rays are not going to want their top prospect to start the year on the bench.

Whether he makes the roster or not, his powerful bat will be a ton of fun to watch in the coming weeks.

Brandon Guyer

After missing almost the entire 2012 season with a shoulder injury, outfielder Brandon Guyer is returning to baseball this spring hoping for a fresh start.

Guyer has already had two very brief stints in the majors in the past two seasons, but has spent most of his time with Triple-A Durham where he has produced pretty well.

After missing such a significant amount of time, Guyer is no longer considered a top prospect in the organization like he was once. Spring training will be a great opportunity for him to prove that he’s an MLB-caliber player.

He’ll also be competing for the backup outfield spot on the Opening Day roster, but it’s probably going to take a standout performance this spring to accomplish that.

Hak-Ju Lee

One of the Rays’ better position player prospects and shortstop prospects in all of baseball, Hak-Ju Lee is definitely a must-watch this spring in Port Charlotte.

His blazing speed and tremendous defensive upside will surely attract plenty of attention in the next few weeks.

Lee has played with both Class A+ Charlotte and Class AA Montgomery for the past two seasons after being acquired in the Matt Garza blockbuster trade. He still hasn’t had the breakout year in the minors that Rays fans have been anticipating, but nonetheless has made slow progress up the organizational ranks.

Lee will be eyeing a spot on Triple-A Durham’s Opening Day lineup, and a good spring training performance would obviously help his case.

Rays Upate: Rays Tie Boston, Acquire Kyle Hudson

The latest Rays news and notes:

  • The Rays tied the Red Sox 7-7 yesterday, as three big home runs avoided the Rays losing their 17th spring game despite some sloppy play. Carlos Pena, Evan Longoria, and Luke Scott all belted solo homers. Some other notable offensive performances came from Jose Lobaton (3-4 with two RBI) and Sean Rodriguez (2-4 with an RBI). Pitching wise, the Rays just did not have it yesterday. Jeff Niemann was scratched from his scheduled start with a nasty blister on his pitching hand, so the Rays went with the bullpen throughout the whole game. Kyle Farnsworth started the game allowing a run through his one inning pitched, then Joel Peralta and Burke Badenhop followed with scoreless outings. Wade Davis pitched three innings and allowed five runs, but only one earned. Still, he let up five hits, which is evidence that he wasn’t on his A-game Saturday. Boston only put out one Major League hitter throughout the entire game, which concerns me a bit. The Rays’ four errors were the biggest reason for the lost, something that’s very uncharacteristic of them. Click here for a full boxscore of yesterday’s game.
  • The Rays added to their Triple-A depth yesterday, acquiring outfielder Kyle Hudson from the Texas Rangers for future considerations. Hudson, 25, hit .296 with 41 stolen in the minors last season (A+, AAA, AAA). The 5’11 left-hander has absolutely no power, but he has good speed and some contact ability. I had a feeling the Rays would make a minor league move within this week after hearing Andrew Friedman on a live telecast yesterday saying that he’d like to have a little bit more position player depth. It only took a few hours before Friedman pulled off a deal.
  • The Rays continue to narrow down their roster, as Jesus Feliciano and Will Rhymes were reassigned to minor league camp yesterday. The latest round of cuts leaves Jeff Salazar as the front-funner for the backup outfielder job, but of course, Brandon Guyer still has a pretty good shot.

Evaluation on the Rays’ Top Prospects 2012: Part 3

20120322-171412.jpgThis is part three of The Rays Rant’s evaluation on the Rays’ top prospects. To view part one of the series, click here. For part two, click here. All rankings are based off MLB.com’s top organization prospect list.

11. Parker Markel

Scouting Report: The Rays could have a future reliever in right-hander Parker Markel. The 21-year-old started 13 games last year in the New York-Penn League, and pitched pretty well in his first season as a starter. Markel went 3-4 with a 3.14 ERA through 57.1 innings pitched. The six-foot-four 220-pounder has pretty good stuff, including a quality fastball. His heater ranges in the low 90’s, while generating plenty of ground outs. Markel also has a plus changeup to complement his fastball, but his secondary pitches are a bit of a question after that. He does have a slider with potential in his arsenal, but he didn’t show it much at all last year. Markel’s stuff is not one of his main areas of concern. Most scouts can agree that his mechanics are lacking, which doesn’t help his case at all for a starting role. Markel also needs to continue to improve his command, even though it appears as if he’s going in the right direction in that department. Low strikeout rates are another red flag for Markel, which is a big strange considering scouting reports’ admiration on his stuff. Strikeout ratios may not be a big deal at the MLB level, but they sometimes can be a foreshadowing sign for pitchers in the early stages of the minors.

Conclusion: Chances are that Markel ends up becoming a reliever with the Rays’ organization, rather than a starter. Although he may have good enough stuff to become a big league starter, a relief role is clearly the best fit for him. Markel doesn’t have the stamina for a starting role; at least that’s what his 2011 short-season numbers reflected. Markel’s three-pitch arsenal and groundball-inducing abilities are other reasons why his future’s brighter as a reliever. From the Rays’ perspective, a good young reliever is really just as great as another starting pitcher. Tampa could use a lot more help in that department, and they have a lot to like about Markel when he joins their ‘pen.

12. Josh Sale

Offensively: Former first-round draft Josh Sale hasn’t been written off just yet after his poor professional debut. The 20-year-old slugger hit .210 with just four homers and 15 RBI last year with the Rookie League Princeton Rays. Sale was drafted for his big-time offensive ability. He possesses huge raw power and excellent bat speed from his big left-handed swing, giving him the potential to become a very good hitter. As the stats show, it’s clear that Sale needs to work on his plate approach in order to make more contact. Once the ball starts meeting the bat, Sale’s homerun-power will quickly shine on the baseball field. Baserunning wise, Sale has never excelled at all in that department. The muscular six-foot 215-pounder lacks athletic ability to some degree, and is a below-average runner overall.

Defensively: Defense is probably Sale’s biggest weakness on the diamond. Although he has improved at his corner outfield position, he’s still probably a below-average outfielder overall. Sale has a naturally strong arm, and his overall throwing abilities are about average and could become above-average if he continues to improve. He has worked hard to fix some issues with his arm action, and will hopefully convert his raw strength into a decent throwing arm in the outfield. As I said before, Sale lacks speed. Although he’s not slow, he doesn’t have much range at all in the outfield.

Conclusion: At 20 years of age, Sale has ways to go. Time and experience is really what he needs to reach his full potential. Sale knows what he needs to needs to do in order to progress through the minors, and he eventually his outstanding hitting abilities will break through with hard work.

13. Brandon Guyer

Offensively: Acquired in the Matt Garza trade, Guyer quickly excelled during his first year in the Rays’ organization. In his first ever big league at bat, Guyer blasted a homer into the seats of Camden Yards. That would be the first of 15 games he’d play for the Rays in 2011, as Guyer spent most of the season in Triple-A Durham. In his 107 games in AAA, he batted .312 with 14 home runs and 61 RBI. A career .297 hitter in the minors, Guyer is a very good all-around offensive player. The 25-year-old has the ability to make good contact, hit for power, and steal bases with great speed. The Rays could really use a guy on the roster like Guyer, who brings the uncommon combination of speed and power to the table.

Defensively: An excellent athlete, Guyer’s a good defensive outfielder overall. His fast legs help him run down balls in the gap well, and his accurate throwing is also a plus. Guyer’s arm strength is about average, which is probably the main reason why he profiles better as a corner-outfielder in the majors. Still, Guyer has plenty of experience at center and will be able to fill in there when needed.

Conclusion: As Guyer nears a big league breakthrough, he’s one guy the Rays will definitely keep an eye on. A crowded outfield is the only thing that has kept him away from significant playing time in the majors, and his five-tool abilities will continue to inch him closer to a spot on the roster. Guyer appears to be developing into a better hitter overall, especially power-wise. If he continues to succeed in the minors, Guyer could very possibly be a key player for the Rays as early as this season.

14. Alex Colome

Scouting Report: Alex Colome is not exactly a known name among baseball’s top prospects or even the Rays’ prospects, but he’s one talented arm. Colome is a power pitcher, depending heavily upon his hard fastball and sharp curveball. The changeup is another pitch that Colome likes to mix up in his arsenal, but it’s still a developing pitch for a him. His secondary pitches will be crucial for him as he progresses through the Rays’ system. Like most of the Rays’ top pitching prospects, Colome’s main issue is command. Colome had stints with both Class-A Charlotte and Class-AA Montgomery last year. His combined stats included a 3.82 ERA, a 12-9 record and a terrific 9.6 K/9 ratio. The command was what contributed to the mediocre ERA, but Colome showed that he can be a great strikeout pitcher. Colome’s electric stuff is what makes him a hit with the scouts.

Conclusion: At just 23 years of age, the six-foot-two right-hander still has a lot of baseball left in his minor league career. It looks like he’ll be starting in high Single-A in 2012, where he hopes it won’t take him too long to move up from there. Even with the Rays over-crowded pitching depth, Colome could very possibly make his debut sometime during the 2013 season.

15. Ryan Brett

Offensively: The Rays drafted a scrappy second baseman in Ryan Brett during the third round of the 2010 draft. His old-fashion, aggressive approach to the game makes him a perfect fit in the Rays’ organization. The 20-year-old switch hitter posted a .300/.370/.471 line along with three homers and 24 RBI during his 61 games in Rookie League ball last season. Brett has shown the ability to make consistent contact at the plate, with plenty of solid line drives. He has more pop in his bat than he appears with his five-foot-nine 180-pound stature, but still won’t provide much power in his career. As for base running, Brett has great speed and the knack to steal bases. He swiped 21 bags last year, and his good instincts on the basepaths should lead to more stolen-base success in the future.

Defensively: Brett has improved a lot over the past year defensively, as second base continues to appear as his position as he starts his pro baseball career. His overall defense is somewhere around average, and most scouts agree that he needs to improve his overall fielding. I expect Brett to move forward defensively in 2012, as he has a chance to become a solid second baseman in the future.

Conclusion: Brett is no Dustin Pedroia, but there’s still a lot of upside to him. He has several years ahead of him in the minors, and 2012 will be important for him as he starts his first full-season of work. Brett will probably continue to be one of those under-the-radar prospects because of his size, but his great offensive approach should eventually get him some notice as he moves up the ranks.